Tag Archives: quilt

2 minute video tutorial: Crazy 4-patch quilt blocks

Video tutorial: crazy 4-patch quilt blocks

This is a very easy and fun block to make. This block is perfect for layer cakes.

Learn to make crazy 4-patch quilt blocks

Learn in 2 minutes:

Materials

  • 4 – 10″ squares

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Video tutorial: Centered tucks with bow ties

Centered tucks with bow ties fabric manipulation tutorial

I love fabric manipulations on quilts and this is one of my favourites. It would work great on clothing too.

How to make tucks with bow ties

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Materials

  • One 6 x 10 1/2 inch rectangle
  • Two 6 1/2 x 2 1/2 inch strips
  • Two 10 1/2 x 2 1/2 inch strips

Block size

10 1/2 inches.

I have made this block as part of a textured quilt and this is my other tutorial for the same block: Block 5: Centered tucks with bow ties -Textured quilt sampler

Close up

Romantic floral lap quilt free pattern: easy pattern for beginners

This quilt is as easy as it gets. The blocks are easy four patch. To make it even easier use pre cut charm squares.

For tips on how to sew accurately this block if you’re a beginner quilter, check out Quilt basics article. There is a section called Matching Intersecting Seams half way down the article that shows how to make the perfect 4 patch block.

Quilt finished size: 41 3/4 in x 53 1/4 in.

Materials

  • 2 charm packs (usually each pack contains 42 x 5 in squares) or 80 x 5 inch fabric squares
  • 1 yard of cream fabric for sashing
  • 45 in x 55 in backing fabric
  • 45 in x 55 in quilt batting
  • half yard for binding. You will need a long strip 2 in x 192 in

Instructions

This quilt has 20 four patch blocks.

Arrange the charm squares to your liking ensuring there’s enough contrast in the chosen fabrics.

You will be making 20 blocks like this one:

Stitch left and right squares together in two rows. Then stitch both rows together.

Once you have all 20 four patch blocks stitched, it’s time to add the sashing.

Cut and add the sashing

This quilt can be done as Quilt as you go or QAYG:

or or you can do it the traditional way:

For the sashing you’ll need to cut

  • three 3 in x 53 1/4 in strips and
  • sixteen 3 in x 9 in strips.

Now let’s add the sashing.

Before you start, arrange the placement of the blocks on a flat surface.

Now take one block and  stitch a short strip to the bottom of the block.

Add the next block, and another short strip.

Do this 5 times until you have stitched 5 blocks in a column. Ensure that there is no sashing at the top and bottom of each column.

Do the steps above for make 3 more columns.

Now stitch the 4 columns using the long strips as per picture.

 

You’re almost done.

You just need to cut the batting and the backing fabric and quilt the three pieces together.

Machine binding

I have been machine binding my quilts lately. It takes a small fraction of the time compared to slip stitching them at the back.

To machine bind a quilt, you need to place the binding on the back of the quilt, aligned to the edge of the quilt, as opposed to stitching it to the front first.

For small lap quilts I don’t use binding cut on the bias but just cut straight from across the grain of the fabric.

To start, cut a strip about 225 in x 2 1/2 in. You’ll need to cut several strips and piece them together to obtain this length.

Fold the strip in half and iron well.

Take the quilt on the back and place the raw edge of the strip aligned with the quilt edge.

Mitered corners

Stitch all the way to the corner stopping at 1/4 in from the edge.

Now fold the strip up in a 45 degree angle as per picture.

Then fold the strip back aligning the fold with the top edge as per picture. Pin.

Now stitch all the way to the end again, stopping at 1/4 from the corner and do the same again for the next corner.

Once you have done the stitching your top will look like this.

Now fold the strip back over the top of the quilt. The binding will cover the raw edge all the way to covering the stitching line.

When you reach a corner, with your finger fold the mitred corner as per picture.  First fold in a 90 degree angle the binding at the corner.

And then fold back again as per picture making sure you align both corners.

Pin the whole quilt binding this way.

And now top stitch as close to the edge as possible.

The binding is done.

 

The quilt is finished!

Make a quilt: 17 free tutorials of my quilts

In this post I’m putting together a number of the quilts I have learned with and the techniques I’ve experimented with. You will find traditional quilts along side improv patchwork and textured quilts.

Improv quilts

Improv/free form quilt series

Each of these six blocks are in themselves a mini quilt and could be turned into a larger quilt as well.

Semi-improv 9-patch quilt tutorial

A traditional block taken a step further by splicing it and rearranging it into making a different block.

Improv patchwork back of quilt

This is a good way to get into improv quilting. Just make a strip of random pieces of fabric stitched together.

Improv patchwork Christmas back of quilt

Doing an improv back of a quilt is a way to loosen up after you complete a highly structured quilt like the zig zag quilt on the other side of this back of quilt.

Free form, free motion patchwork trial

This mini quilt was my first attempt at free form or improv patchwork. It is done in a kind of log cabin way from the inside out.

 

Free form patchwork mini quilt – visual creative process

I liked my first free form mini quilt so much I made a second one. This time the quilt is assembled out of different pieces.

 

Textured quilts

Textured 4-patch quilt tutorial (16 textures)

Some traditional and some new textures in this quilt.

Textured quilt sampler (25 textures)

Most textures in this quilt are traditiona such as pin tucks, shirring, pleats but also there are more uncommon fabric manipulations such as fabric origami.

 Charm pack quilts

“Doubly charming” charm pack quilt tutorial

Made with charm packs this is a very quick but beautiful quilt .

“Doubly charming” charm pack back of quilt tutorial

Made with the left over charms, this back of quilt could very well be a quilt top on its own.

Disappearing nine patch quilt

This is a very easy quilt made with charm squares. The fabric is also beautiful.

Disappearing nine patch variation quilt top

Disappearing nine patch was fun to do so I made a second one using a variation of the block using the same charm packs. I think the prairie points make this quilt look girly and cute.

Père-Noël zigzag quilt tutorial

This zigzag quilt comes with a twist: it uses rectangles to make the zigzag lines. Very easy to do and finished with some embroidery touches.


Scrappy quilts

Wonky log cabin tutorial

Use bright fabrics to make this quilt more fun and add to the wonkiness.

 


Sampler quilt

A traditional quilt made with fat quarters though it could well be made with fabric scraps. I made this quilt because I wanted to improve my patchwork skills. I think it worked.


Coin quilt

You don’t know what to do with all those fabric scraps in your scrap bin? Make a coin quilt. Try different colour combinations, even alternating white and colour rectangles, different thickness, etc for a different look.

Paper pieced scrappy flower hexagon quilt

This quilt is in progress and a long term project where I can use all the small scraps from other projects.

I have made a couple more quilts, including my biggest project: Farmer’s wife quilt sampler but this sample should be enough to choose from.

 

Block 9: Cross shirring – Textured quilt sampler tutorial

Cross shirring closeup

Block type: log cabin

Block size: 11 inches

Colour scheme: reds and neutrals

Texture/fabric manipulation: cross shirring

Quilt size: The finished quilt is 52 ½ x 52 ½.

Needs:

  • one 7 in x 7 in square in cream / white
  • two 5 in x 3 1/2 in rectangles and two 11 in x 3 1/2 in rectangles for the border
Making the cross shirring

Cut one 7 in x 7 in square.

Using a baste stitch start stitching at 1/4 inch from the edge in one straight line.

Continue to stitch at around 1/2 intervals until the end. No need to mark the lines. The last stitching line should also be 1/4 inch from the edge.

When finished, start pulling the bottom thread from each stitching line. Do this from each side. Spread the gathering all along the stitching line. Stop gathering the fabric once the width is 5 inches.

Do this for all stitching lines.

Now do the same as before but in the opposite direction.

Again, pull the bottom thread of each stitching line and gather the fabric until you reach 5 inches width.

Make your square edges as straight as possible so it is easy to attach the border to it and the block irons as flat as possible.

Cut two 5 in x 3 1/2 in rectangles and two 11 in x 3 1/2 in rectangles for the border and sew to the centre square.

Your block is done!

Textured blocks tutorials

This is the 9th block in a series of 25 exploring texture in fabric.

Each block is made out of a centre 5 inch square featuring some fabric texture such as pin tucks, smocking, shirring and the like. Then a 3 1/2 wide border encloses each centre square.

The colour scheme is red and white/cream alternating reds and white/cream for the centre square and border.

Some of the textures show better on plain colours than on heavily patterned fabric.

See all Textured quilt sampler tutorials for this quilt.

Share your pictures

Are you making this quilt? Share your pictures on Flickr’s TeresaDownUnder group.