Tag Archives: embroidery

Book: Patchwork Embroidery

Book cover

I have been so busy I forgot to share the news!

The latest Aimee Ray’s book Patchwork Embroidery was released in November.

I contributed 3 projects to the book. The projects were designed by me, Aimee provided the art work and I made the items. All the projects have a patchwork component as well as embroidery.

Have a look at my projects. Which one do you like best?

A lunch box

Lunch box

A tic-tac-toe board

This one is my favourite and the easiest to make of the 3.

Tic tac toe board

Australian animals baby book

Baby book

The book is beautiful, as all Aimee’s books are. I totally recommend it – disclaimer: I’m not making any money out of this book because I made the projects on commission.

Christmas gift ideas: 5 free sewing tutorials

French poetry napkins

This is a quick project that particularly French teachers will enjoy. To complete the project you will need 5 store bought napkins and some stranded cotton for the lettering and drawings.


Embroidered eye mask

A few fabric scraps are enough to make this quick project. Use fabric with a large print for best results.


Felt bookmark

This project is very easy and perfect for a teacher or anyone who enjoys reading. I used felt die cuts and stranded cotton in matching colours.


Folded star pot holder

This potholder is not difficult to make but it is time consuming so if you intend to make one set an afternoon aside to concentrate on it.


Quilted hot water bottle

Fabric scraps and some batting is all you need to make this quick project.

“Tiffany” iPad patchwork shoulder bag

This is my third iPad carry bag. I take my iPad with my all the time and the fabric just wears out.

The first iPad carry bag I made had a patchwork flap. The second one I used embroidery for. And this time I just made a quick one. I called it Tiffany because the charm squares are from a Moda fabric collection with the same name.

Materials

  • 12 x 5 inch charm squares for the exterior
  • 20 1/2 x 9 in fabric for the lining
  • 2 pieces of batting measuring 21 1/2 x 10 in each
  • 45 inch strap
  • velcro

Instructions

Arrange your charm squares by twos as per picture and stitch together.

Now fold at 10 1/2 inch as per picture.

And draw a short line on each side as per picture. This mark is where the flap starts.

To make the flap, take a dessert plate or a plate that is almost as wide as the panel and place it on top as per picture.

Draw around the plate close to where you drew the short line. Then finish the drawing by adding a straight line between the curve and the 10 1/2 in marking on each side.

If you click on the picture below you’ll see a larger picture and will be able to understand what I mean.

Using the exterior rectangle as a guide, cut the lining piece.

Now you have both pieces, you’ll be cutting the flap at the same time.

Pin well and cut both pieces along the curve.

I wanted to add extra padding to the bag so I used 2 pieces of batting instead of one. You coud use heavy weight interfacing instead.

Cut the pieces of batting using the exterior as a guide. I trimmed off the flap on one of the batting pieces but as it turned out two would have been ok. Your choice.

Pin batting to the exterior.

Quilt any way you like. Lately I kind of like quilting in narrow lines. They look neat.

Trim off the extra batting.

Now place a piece of velcro about 2 inches from the top edge. I don’t like use velcro with adhesive because it always comes apart eventually. And if you stitch it as well as stick it, it ruins the needle.

Stitch around the velcro piece.

Now place the other piece of velcro on the lining part. To find the exact place where to add velcro, place the lining flap over  the exterior as if closing the bag.

Pin and stitch all around.

Now fold the lining piece making sure the straight edge aligns with the line marking where the flap starts.

Mark a 3 inch opening on one side to turn bag inside out.

Stitch around both sides leaving the gap as per picture below to turn the bag inside out.

Now do the same with the exterior. Sorry no photo. I forgot to take one.

Just fold the exterior piece right sides together making sure you align the straight narrow edge with the start of the flap markings. Pin well and stitch around both sides. Trim corners and turn inside out.

Adding the strap

For the first time I purchased a strap. Hopefully it’ll hold the shape better than the homemade ones.

Place the strap about 1 3/4 inch from the edge and pin on each side.

Stitch strap well on each side going up and forth several times. Do not stitch higher than 1/4 from the edge. We need 1/4 inch seam allowance when attaching the lining.

Now place the exterior inside the lining. Pull the strap down.

Align top straight edge and flap from exterior and lining. Pin well.

Stitch all around. Make sure the strap is out of the way.

Now turn bag inside out through the 3 inch opening.

The bag is almost finished.

Stitch the opening.

For neatness’ sake stitch around the flap as close to the edge as possible as per picture.

The bag is finished!

 

 

Hand embroidery projects and ideas

In this post I’ll resurface some of my favourite hand embroidery projects and ideas. Each project comes with a tutorial to make an object as well as a novel way to use embroidery in a non traditional way.

1. Using the fabric design as an embroidery template

The first project is an iPad carrybag. The embroidery pattern is the outline of the fabric I used for the tab and the back scaled down. This is an idea that can take other directions and in future I intend to explore further.

2. Embellishing a quilt with embroidery

This tutorial shows you how to make a Christmas quilt using 5 inch charm squares. The quilt is completed by an embroidered French Christmas poem.

3. Gradient embroidery

This tutorial is for a notebook cover. This type of embroidery can be done with numbers, initials, names and the like. It’s easy though a bit time consuming.

4. Extending fabric print with embroidery

This cozy tutorial is embellished with embroidery. Check out the tutorial and look closely at the fabric. The pattern in the fabric has been filled in with embroidery. I intend to explore this type of embroidery further in the future.

5. Embroidery lettering

These napkins are made as a set. Each of them contains an embroidered line belonging to a French nursery rhyme.

6. Pillow embroidery to match duvet cover

This tutorial contains an embroidery idea for a matching pillow case. The idea was born out of need. I bought a doona cover without matching pillows. I then drew some of the doona cover flowers on the pillow and embroidered them.

7. Embroidering on felt shapes

This tutorial contains instructions on how to make flowers with felt cutouts. I used embroidery to embellish the flowers.

8. Mixing improv patchwork with embroidery

This is a tutorial for a reversible tray cover using basic improv patchwork and embroidery. The words on both sides are in French as well.

If you make any item based on my tutorials pleas share in my Flickr group.

cook … eat … repeat tea towel

A couple of years ago I planned to make two tea towels. Somehow I only got around making one: the French cuisine tea towel.

This is the second one. It’s not a set and it is a faster project with a lot less embroidery. I’m also making use of my textured tutorials I posted as I’m using prairie points for the border.

Both tea towels make great gifts.

If you make one, I’d like to see it. Please upload it to my TeresaDownUnder Flickr pool.

Materials

  • Variegated stranded cotton
  • White fabric – I cut a piece 20 in x 5 1/2 in
  • Tea towel
  • 4 x 5 in charm squares – 3 for the trim and 1 for the embroidery sides

Kitchen towel size

32 x 22 1/2 inches. For a different towel size increase or decrease the pattern below when printing.

Embroidery

Embroidery stitch: stem stitch (stem stitch video tutorial – link will open in another window)

Download pattern

  • Teatowel lettering (pdf – 2 pages). When printing scale it down or up to match your tea towel width

Method

Print the pattern and stick matching the lines as per picture.

Place the strip of white fabric over.

 

Make sure the letters are centred and straight.

Trace with water soluble pen.

 

My variegated embroidery cotton matches the charms colours.

 

Embroider using stem stitch.

 

Press well.

When finished trim the embroidery down to 5 in wide. Then cut 3/4 in from each edge.

At this stage I wanted to add some colour to each edge so I used a charm square for this purpose.

Get a 5 in charm square and cut it in half and stitch each half to each side.

 

Press seams open.

 

Prairie points

For my tea towel I used 3 charm squares, i.e. 12 prairie points. If your tea towel is smaller or larger you may need fewer or more.

I will explain quickly how to make a prairie point here but if you need more visuals try my prairie point tutorial.

Cut each charm square into 4 2 1/2 in squares.

 

Fold in half. Then fold in half again and press the corner with your finger.

Then drag each side corner meet in the middle as per picture.

 

Stitch along each prairie point at 1/8 in from the edge.

 

 

 

Now make a 1/4 seam on each side of the embroidery strip.

 

On both sides.

 

Pin the strip aligned to the edge. Fold the edges in on both edges as per picture. Pin well.

 

Now place the prairie points between the tea towel and the embroidery strip. Pin well making sure everything is aligned.

 

Your will need to adjust the distance between prairie points depending on the width of your tea towel. A bit of overlapping is fine.

Stitch making sure that all three layers – embroidery strip, prairie points and tea towel – are aligned. Use many pins if necessary to avoid having to unpick the stitches as I had to do.

 

To finish stitch also the top of the embroidery strip .

 

Done!