Octagon quilts – video tutorial

There’re different ways to make octagon. Here you can see two techniques to make octagon shapes using foundation piecing and English piecing paper.

Learn to make two octagon quilts

Downloads

My book Turnabout Patchwork

“Turnabout Patchwork. Simple quilts with a twist” is all about playing with blocks – making a block, slicing it up, and turning or repositioning the pieces to make a completely different block (sometimes two smaller blocks) to yield endless quilt tops.

See all the quilts in the book in a real life project

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Share your work!

If you make any of my tutorials this is how you can share your pictures:

  • On Instagram please tag me with @teresadownunder and hashtag #teresadownunder
  • Join my Facebook group and post your pictures there

Seed stitch – easy knitting tutorial

So far we’ve learned to cast on, garter stitch, slipped stitch and bind of or cast off, stockinette and rib stitch.

If you know how to do rib stitch you also know how to do seed stitch. It’s basically the same but you start with the other stitch.

Check it out.

Now put into practice all the knitting you’ve learned so far.

Cast on some stitches on your needle. For instance 35 or 40 stitches, stretch them a bit on your needle to see if that’s the width you’d like your scarf to be.

If too wide, undo a few. If too narrow add a few more stitches.

Knit as many rows as you need for a scarf in seed stitch and when done bind off the piece as you learned above.

Abbreviations on patterns

Notebook cover – video tutorial

Patchwork notebook cover

This tutorial is for a notebook cover that measures 9″ x 15″ but you can make it for any size.

Check out how it’s made.

 

Materials

Fabric

Lining: 1 rectangle 16″ x 10″

Pockets: 4 rectangles 10″ x 5″

Cover: 1 rectangle 16″ x 10″. Mine is made of 3 pieces patched together with the following measurements:

  • 1 rectangle 16″ x 6 1/4″
  • 1 rectangle 16″ x 3 1/2″
  • 1 strip 16″ x 1 1/4″

Fusible interfacing (iron on one side)

  • Lining and cover: 2 rectangle 15″‘ x 10″
  • Pockets: 4 rectangles 10″ x 5″
  • 1 elastic ban (optional)
  • 1 fabric covered button (optional)

Stitch all three rectangles together to make the cover.

Iron with the hems open.

Cut all your other pieces.

Stitch your pockets to make 2 squares. Iron with the hems open.

Fold the cover in two along the long side and make a marking in the middle. Stitch the elastic band where the marking is with the elastic band placed facing inside the fabric (see picture).

Iron the interface to the inside of the fabrics. Getting the interfacing to stick to the fabric when the cover is turned inside out is tricky.

Iron the pocket in half, wrong sides together and pin to the sides of the lining as per the above picture.

Place the cover on top, right sides together, as per the picture.

Pin in place and stitch all around leaving a 4 inch gap to turn the cover inside out.

The corners need to be trimmed after stitching to reduce the bulk after turning inside out.

After turning the cover inside out you end up with a neat cover. The turning is quite tricky because the fusible interface tends to come loose. Pinning it in place temporarily may work.

Try to fit the notebook in the cover now. This may give you an indication of how closely you need to stitch around the cover.

Top stitch around very close to the edge, about 1mm or 2mm depending on how tight you want the cover to fit.

The corners are almost inevitably round unless you have removed much of the fabric on the inside hem.

The book cover is finished.

Place the notebook inside.

Voila!

I used a fabric covered button because I think it looks smart but you could use a plain button. Also, instead of an elastic band you could use a ribbon, in which case it would need to be stitch to both sides of the cover.

Other notebooks

See also the notebook cover PJ did based on this tutorial.

Two classic blocks: maple leaf and quarter log cabin

Maple leaf and quarter log cabin are classic blocks.

They’re quick and easy to make. Learn with this video.

My book Turnabout Patchwork

“Turnabout Patchwork. Simple quilts with a twist” is all about playing with blocks – making a block, slicing it up, and turning or repositioning the pieces to make a completely different block (sometimes two smaller blocks) to yield endless quilt tops.

See all the quilts in the book in a real life project

Do you wish to receive my tutorials in your inbox?

Share your work!

If you make any of my tutorials this is how you can share your pictures:

  • On Instagram please tag me with @teresadownunder and hashtag #teresadownunder
  • Join my Facebook group and post your pictures there

Mini churn dash quilt block – Tiny quilt QAL

Churn dash is a classic block. And how cute is this version at 3″ x 3″ finished size.

The video demonstrates how to make the block with foundation piecing. In such small sizes I find it’s a lot easier to get an accurate block that using traditional piecing. but traditional templates are also available on my Etsy shop.

I used regular copy paper but you may find it to be a bit thick.

You can use special paper for foundation piecing if you prefer.

Let’s get to it!

How to make a 3″ churn dash block

Note: I recently started to use an Add a quarter ruler, the yellow ruler in the video, after some followers recommended it and I have to say it’s a true time saver.

Download the foundation paper template

Traditional templates

Traditional templates are available on my Etsy shop.

Don’t forget to join my Facebook group so you can show photos of your quilts and blocks, see everyone else’s quilts and just share tips and experiences.

My book Turnabout Patchwork

“Turnabout Patchwork. Simple quilts with a twist” is all about playing with blocks – making a block, slicing it up, and turning or repositioning the pieces to make a completely different block (sometimes two smaller blocks) to yield endless quilt tops.

See all the quilts in the book in a real life project

Do you wish to receive my tutorials in your inbox?

Share your work!

If you make any of my tutorials this is how you can share your pictures:

  • On Instagram please tag me with @teresadownunder and hashtag #teresadownunder
  • Join my Facebook group and post your pictures there

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TeresaDownUnder

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