Bag tutorial round up

Here is a list of bags I have made over the last couple of years:

  1. Expandable tote bag
  2. Patchwork beach bag
  3. Tote bag tutorial
  4. Laptop slipcover with straps
  5. Charm pack tote bag with inside pocket tutorial
  6.  Charm squares and embroidery tote bag

And the last one: Spirit tote bag

 

All the tutorials are free.

If you make any of the bags, please upload a picture to TeresaDownUnder tote bags and my other sewing projects Flickr pool.

Block 3: Double controlled pleats – Textured quilt sampler tutorial

Closeup

Block type: log cabin

Block size: 11 inches

Colour scheme: reds and neutrals

Texture/fabric manipulation: double controlled pleats

Quilt size: The finished quilt is 52 ½ x 52 ½.

Needs:

  • one 6 in x 15 in rectangle in red tones for the textured centre square
  • two 5 in x 3 1/2 in rectangles and two 11 in x 3 1/2 in rectangles for the border
Making the pleats

Mark the fabric at 1 and 1 1/2 inch intervals. Do this on both sides, top and bottom.

Now pick up the scissors and make a small cut on each mark like below. Do this on both sides, top and bottom.

The 1 1/2 inch intervals is the fold, the 1 inch interval is the distance between folds.

To make the pleats take the first cut, fold the fabric making the first cut coincide with the second cut.

Pin the fold obtained.

Now move the fold into the next cut and make the fold coincide with the next cut.

Continue like so until you finish all the marks.

Now start from the opposite side and do the same as you did earlier. It will be easier to find the fold as you can use the folded side as a guide too.

Do not press, just flatten the pleats with your hands. You can also apply some steam with your iron at a short distance from the fabric if desired.

Stitch along the side leaving one inch seam allowance. This will allow you to trim the square to 5 inches square when finished sewing the pleats.

Sew the second side with a 1/4 seam allowance. Trim to 5 inch square.

Cut two 5 in x 3 1/2 in rectangles and two 11 in x 3 1/2 in rectangles for the border.

Add the border to the centre square.

Textured blocks tutorials

This is the 3rd block in a series of 25 exploring texture in fabric.

Each block is made out of a centre 5 inch square featuring some fabric texture such as pin tucks, smocking, shirring and the like. Then a 3 1/2 wide border encloses each centre square.

The colour scheme is red and white/cream alternating reds and white/cream for the centre square and border.

Some of the textures show better on plain colours than on heavily patterned fabric.

See all Textured quilt sampler tutorials for this quilt.

Share your pictures

Are you making this quilt? Share your pictures on Flickr’s TeresaDownUnder group.

Block 2: Diamond pin tucks – Textured quilt sampler tutorial

Closeup of diamond pin tucks

Block type: log cabin

Block size: 11 inches

Colour scheme: reds and neutrals

Texture/fabric manipulation: diamond pin tucks

Quilt size: The finished quilt is 52 ½ x 52 ½.

Needs:

  • one 7 in x 7 in square in red tones for the textured centre square
  • two 5 in x 3 1/2 in rectangles and two 11 in x 3 1/2 in rectangles for the border

Mark the back of the fabric in diagonal at 1 inch intervals. I did not mark my fabric. I used the polka dots to help me when I pressed the fabric.

Press along the marked line.

Now fold each marked line and pass it through the machine. Stitch very close to the edge.

Your piece of fabric will look wrong when you’ve done one side. I almost started again not realising that the square will correct itself when you stitch on from the opposite sides making diamonds.

Press flat from the back but don’t press too hard so that the pin tucks are completely flattened.

Again mark the back of the fabric with lines at 1 inch intervals and press along the marked lines again. You can see in the picture how the diamonds appear after pressing.

Now do as you did earlier, fold the fabric along the pressed lines and put through the machine very close to the edge.

This will produce the diamonds and will square the fabric.

Closeup of the diamonds.

Trim the fabric to 5 inches square.

Cut two 5 in x 3 1/2 in rectangles and two 11 in x 3 1/2 in rectangles for the border.

Sew as per picture and there you have it.

Textured blocks tutorials

This is the second block in a series of 25 exploring texture in fabric.

Each block is made out of a centre 5 inch square featuring some fabric texture such as pin tucks, smocking, shirring and the like. Then a 3 1/2 wide border encloses each centre square.

The colour scheme is red and white/cream alternating reds and white/cream for the centre square and border.

Some of the textures show better on plain colours than on heavily patterned fabric.

See all Textured quilt sampler tutorials for this quilt.

Share your pictures

Are you making this quilt? Share your pictures on Flickr’s TeresaDownUnder group.

Block 1: Pin tucks – Textured quilt sampler tutorial

This is the first block in a series of 25 exploring texture in fabric.

Each block is made out of a centre 5 inch square featuring some fabric texture such as pin tucks, smocking, shirring and the like. Then a 3 1/2 wide border encloses each centre square.

The colour scheme is red and white/cream alternating reds and white/cream for the centre square and border.

Some of the textures show better on plain colours than on heavily patterned fabric.

Block type: log cabin

Block size: 11 inches

Colour scheme: reds and neutrals

Texture/fabric manipulation:  pin tucks

Quilt size: The finished quilt is 52 1/2 x 52 1/2.

Needs:

  • one 5 in x 7 in rectangle in red for the textured centre square
  • two 5 in x 3 1/2 in rectangles and two 11 in x 3 1/2 in rectangles for the border
Making the pintucks
Cut one 5 in x 7 in rectangle and mark it on the back at 1 inch intervals.

Fold at each mark and press. You could use pin to secure after pressing though I didn’t feel it was necessary with such a small piece of fabric.

Once you have pressed every line, put each fold through your machine and stitch as close to the edge as possible.

Your piece will be curled up when you finish.

Press the piece from the back but not so hard that the pintucks will be flattened and trim to a 5 inch square.

Now add the white border as per picture.

Textured blocks tutorials

See all Textured quilt sampler tutorials for this quilt.

Share your pictures

Are you making this quilt? Share your pictures on Flickr’s TeresaDownUnder group.

Improv patchwork headboard makeover

My last improv quilt started as a headboard cover but I changed my mind half way through and I decided to just mount the quilt on canvas.

The headboard design is 100% improv. It did the design as a colour study without any planning other than selecting the fabrics I wanted to use.

My fabrics were Moda Bella solids. I used 100% linen for the background fabric. Linen is not easy to work with. This was my first time and it can be challenging because it stretches quite easily.

The following illustrates the process I followed.

The pieces were hand. I did not use a ruler. To measure I placed the previous piece on top of the fabric to eyeball the width or height and just cut by hand.

I made my pieces usually larger so I could trim after sewing.

I sometimes planned a whole section of the design.

To cut curves I placed one fabric on top of the other and followed the curved piece as a cutting line for the second piece.

After sewing a curve it is important that some cuts are made along the stitch line so that it irons flat.

I made adjustments along the way, adding bits here and there to break large areas on one single colour.

The design is trimmed when necessary.

I wanted to add some texture to the design too and I added some pleats in a couple of places.

I marked some lines where I wanted to have the pleats and ironed the piece and pinned it.

I made a large piece and then I stitched through the middle.

Then I cut the piece in two.

I used both pieces in different places.

I added one piece between two colours though the texture is not visible in the photo.

As pieces are added it is usually necessary to square the piece before adding the next one.

The design continues to grow and I still don’t have much of an idea of where it is going. I just don’t want to do anything too large.

I added some interest with some stripes on the side.

By the time I had reached the size I wanted I started to square the design.

But I needed to integrate the design a bit more into the background, give it some “roots”.

I added then a large block that roots the design to one side.



The other side also needs to be integrated to the background.

I used the left over strips cut and re stitched.

Now I just needed to frame the design by adding a large border big enough that will cover the headboard.

Closeup.

Closeup of the pleats.

Then the piece needs to be stapled to the headboard.

Place over the board.

Start by stapling the top.

Then staple the opposite side.

This is the stapling order I followed.

Done!

TeresaDownUnder

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