Flange quilt binding – 16 Half Square Triangle sampler quilt – video tutorial

Video tutorial: Flange binding or adding faux piping to your quilt binding

You may remember my 16 half square triangle sampler quilt. This is the binding I used for it. I love it!

A flange adds a very special touch to the finish of your quilt. It doesn’t take much longer to add a flange than to use regular plain binding. Actually, it takes less time because there’s no hand sewing involved.

Have I convinced you yet? Check it out for yourself.

Video tutorial: machine binding with a flange or faux piping

This is how you add a flange to your quilt quickly and easily:

 

Video tutorial: Free motion quilting tutorial

Video tutorial: Free motion quilting tutorial

This tutorial goes only for over 2 minutes but it teaches you the basics of free motion quilting. It also suggests some easy free motion patterns to start with.

How to do free motion quilting video tutorial

You can do free motion quilting on a domestic machine.

You will need to use a darning foot and lower the feed dogs of your machine so you can move the quilt sandwich freely.

Start with small projects.

You can try with one block or potholder. Why not use the Disappearing pinwheel block that appears on the video tutorial to start?

Free motion is not hard but it requires quite a few hours of practice to get confident at it. Think of it as learning to write.

Above all be patient. Your first attempts may be awful but don’t give up. Practice makes perfect.

Video tutorial: Free motion quilting tutorial

Jane A. Stickle Quilt row C: JAS-C05 – Eye of the Cyclone

The method to make block B02 is the  base to this block.

The block is a bit fiddly but it’s not hard to make though appliqué is still a bit of a challenge for me and the curves aren’t very smooth.

The original block and the instruction ns on the pattern indicate that the outside clover shape should be made out of a 4 patch block but that’s not what I did.

Instructions

I cut 2 x 5 1/2 inch squares in white and 2 x 5 1/2 inch squares in green and made 2 pinwheels as shown on the video:

I printed the Susan Gatewood’s pattern and stuck the outside clover together with sticky tape to make a pattern. I appliquéd this on top of the double pinwheel at the end.

I cut off the paper inside the clover.

To work out the size of the circle, I used the pattern and a compass.

The circle’s diameter is 3 inches. I drew a circle on to freezer paper and cut out.

I cut the circle out and made sure it was wide enough to fit into the clover.

I pressed the circle to the back of one of the pinwheels and drew another circle around adding 1/4 inch seam allowance.

I cut out the shape and placed it on top of the other pinwheel as per picture. I used a headpin to help aligning the centre on both pinwheels.

I pinned the circle well before appliquéing.

I cut out the excess fabric at the back.

 

Then I removed the freezer paper and pressed well.

Then I traced the clover on to freezer paper.

And cut the freezer paper adding 1/4 inch all around the shape.

Then I cut along the blue line and made a few incisions around the curves.

I then appliquéd the white shape to the background.

I trimmed off excess fabric.

And this is the finished block.

Where to get the Jane A. Stickle Quilt patterns

Susan Gatewood’s paper foundation . All patterns are free though Susan says “I only ask that you consider making a donation to the Bennington Museum, in Bennington, Vermont. And if you do, it would make me tremendously happy if you would tell them that you have received help from me.” I totally recommend Susan’s patterns as they are very easy to use.

How to put all the Dear Jane blocks together with QAYG

Dear Jane progress

See all blocks I’ve done together in a larger size.

 

 

Video tutorial: fabric origami

Video tutorial: Fabric origami - fabric manipulation

How to make this diamond fabric manipulation

Watch this short 3 minute video and learn:

Materials

  • One 18 inch square in white
  • Small buttons or beads

Video tutorial: Fabric origami - fabric manipulation

This origami fabric manipulation can be used on clothing but also on a quilt as shown on the block below.

Get the tutorial for the beaded origami quilt block below.
Video tutorial: fabric origami - fabric manipulation

Close up

Jane A. Stickle Quilt row C: JAS-C04 – Tic Tac Toe

In spite of what I thought when I saw the pattern below, this block was a lot easier and even less time consuming than I anticipated.

I downloaded the block on Susan Gatewood’s website. I’ve done the quilt using her blocks and up until now they’ve all been perfect. I think her patterns are closer to the original than the book’s diagrams.

This pattern has quite a few very tiny pieces. I’m again very happy I’m doing this quilt using paper piecing. I don’t know how else I would have managed the tic tac toe central piece. The smallest pieces are 1/4 inch squares!

But I managed! No piece is too small when foundation paper piecing!

At this stage I’m thinking how I am going to remove the paper.

I’m quite satisfied with this block.  And happy it is over.

Where to get the Jane A. Stickle Quilt patterns

Susan Gatewood’s paper foundation . All patterns are free though Susan says “I only ask that you consider making a donation to the Bennington Museum, in Bennington, Vermont. And if you do, it would make me tremendously happy if you would tell them that you have received help from me.” I totally recommend Susan’s patterns as they are very easy to use.

How to do foundation paper piecing

You can learn the principles of foundation piecing on this 2 minute video. These principles can be applied to any foundation piecing blocks no matter how complex they are.

Dear Jane progress

See all blocks I’ve done together in a larger size.