Jane A. Stickle Quilt row B: JAS-B03 – Mirror Image

This is again an easy block. This block is pieced.

I cut only one piece of each from the pattern sheet and drew 2 pieces of each on the print fabric.

And two of each on the white fabric.

Then I used the pattern pieces again, trimmed off the seam allowance and used the piece to draw the seam allowance on each piece of fabric.

I learned this trick on thatquilt. There’s no need to clip both seams, just the concave seam. It’s that easy!

Another important thing is to find the middle in both pieces.

Just fold each piece in half and pin through the middle.

Align both pieces on the middle point. Then pin on each edge and then in the middle.

Just stitch along the line.

Press well.

And stitch together.

As it turned out the centre seams don’t meet but I can live with that.

Where to get the Jane A. Stickle Quilt patterns

Susan Gatewood’s paper foundation . All patterns are free though Susan says “I only ask that you consider making a donation to the Bennington Museum, in Bennington, Vermont. And if you do, it would make me tremendously happy if you would tell them that you have received help from me.” I totally recommend Susan’s patterns as they are very easy to use.

Virtual quilt

See all blocks I’ve done together in a larger size.

Jane A. Stickle Quilt row B: JAS-B02 – Sweet Tater Pie

This block is easy.

Susan Gatewood’s site has the patterns to piece this block but she also suggests an alternative way of putting this block together using two pinwheels blocks. This is similar to the method demonstrated in thatquilt. In thatquilt the appliqué method is needleturn with freezer paper on top. I used regular needleturn with freezer paper below.

Cut 2 x 5 1/2 inch squares in white and 2 5 1/2 inch squares in brown and make 2 pinwheels.

Do this with all squares to obtain 2 pinwheels.

Sitch together each pinwheel.

Print Susan Gatewood pattern and measure the finished circle radius using a compass.

Using the radius trace a circle on freezer paper.

Now measure again, this time including the bottom seam allowance.

Get one of the pinwheels and trace a circle.

Cut the circle and press the freezer paper on the back of the circle.

Now baste around the seam allowance.

Pull the thread.

Pin a needle through the middle .

Now push the needle through the centre of the pinwheel underneath to align the circle to the pinwheel.

Align all lines and pin well.

Appliqué the circle to the pinwheel block.

Almost there.

Cut out a circle on the back.

Remove the freezer paper.

Trim off excess fabric to obtain a 5 inch block.

Where to get the Jane A. Stickle Quilt patterns

Susan Gatewood’s paper foundation . All patterns are free though Susan says “I only ask that you consider making a donation to the Bennington Museum, in Bennington, Vermont. And if you do, it would make me tremendously happy if you would tell them that you have received help from me.” I totally recommend Susan’s patterns as they are very easy to use.

Virtual quilt

See all blocks I’ve done together in a larger size.

Jane A. Stickle Quilt row B: JAS-B01 – Bachelor Buttons

While I was doing row A I had a quick look at row B and it looked like the row from hell.

As it turned out block B01 is an easy one. My applique circles aren’t perfectly round but I was expecting that.

I used reverse appliqué with freezer paper on top and a charm square for the background.

I cut out one of Susan Gatewood’s circles from her free pattern to use as a template to draw the circles.

I cut a 4 1/2 in square of freezer paper. To work out the placement of the circles I drew a grid like below. I drew a line at 1 1/4 intervals on each direction.

Then I put a needle through the centre of the circle and through one of the axis in the freezer paper.

I drew all the circles this way.

Then I cut them out using a very small pair of scissors. This is important if you’re a bit scissor challenged like me.

So here is my charm square.

And the fabric for the circle.

I pressed the frezzer paper on top of the charm square.

I cut the fabric around leaving a 1/4 seam allowance. A bit smaller would have been easier to turn over.

And also I made some small cuts all the way to the freezer paper.

Then I placed the white fabric underneath.

I basted the three layers so they wouldn’t move.

And started the appliqué.

All done.

Remove the basting and freezer paper.

This is the back.

Trim off excess fabric and that’s it.

Where to get the Jane A. Stickle Quilt patterns

Susan Gatewood’s paper foundation . All patterns are free though Susan says “I only ask that you consider making a donation to the Bennington Museum, in Bennington, Vermont. And if you do, it would make me tremendously happy if you would tell them that you have received help from me.” I totally recommend Susan’s patterns as they are very easy to use.

Virtual quilt

See all blocks I’ve done together in a larger size.

Upcycled denim pants travel bag with improv patchwork

Upcycled travel bag tutorial

This is not only a bag with improv patchwork but also a sort of improv travel bag too. I don’t have any clue about how to construct pants or any garment. The way I went about doing this was rather approximate as you will see. I am not going to give any sizes of fabric, jeans or whatever because it will depend on the size of the pants you use. Before you start, align the top of the waist jeans together and pin. Believe me it makes things better if you do this.

I started with an old pair of jean. This pair in particular had pockets lower than the start of the legs. I wanted to preserve the pockets so I cut the pants lower than the pockets.

Then I cut each leg bit individually as per picture.

I pinned both sides, from each leg together. The point of this exercise was to get a straight piece of jeans. I drew a straight line of where the seam should go.

I stitched along the line.

I turned the pants around and did the same thing on the other side. In both instances excess fabric needs to be trimmed off.

This is the resulting piece from step one.

Now trim both front and back as per picture. Make sure the rectangle is the same height on both right and left side.

Improv patchwork

There’re many of ways of doing improv patchwork. I have posted tutorials on improv patchwork before. For this bag,  I stitched pieces of fabric together of approximately the same length until I got a bigger piece. Then I put it aside.

I continued to stitch bigger pieces from smaller pieces.

You will need to trim pieces as you continue to piece. For instance I stitched a rectangle on an an angle in the piece below.

Then I trimmed it to fit with the rectangular shape of the larger piece. I usually try to get to a rectangular or square piece because then it is easier to assemble the different pieces.

By this stage I thought I’d have enough for the bottom of the bag.

I started to assemble the pieces and trimming them into a rectangle.

When you trim your pieces they can be reused to square other improv pieces. Do not throw anything away.

Prepare the denim pants.

You need to decide how big you want your bag to be and then decide on the size of your improv patchwork piece. My improv patchwork is about 7 inches wide by the width of the pants. I made a large strip/rectangle and stitched it into a tube. Then I placed the pants inside the patchwork tube and aligned the bottom edge.

I pinned well.

I stitched along the edge leaving 1/4in seam allowance.

That’s it. The bottom is attached. I pressed the seam well.

Then I turned the bag inside out and pinned along the bottom edge to make the exterior sac.

I stitched all along the bottom edge leaving 1/4 inch allowance.

Time to box the corners of the bag. My photos aren’t great on this step so if they don’t make any sense please check Sew 4 home tutorial. Place the bag as per picture below and mark 2 1/2 in from the corner.

Stitch along the line and cut off excess fabric.

Do on both sides and voilà! Done!

Lining

Usually I stitch the lining by machine but this time I don’t want to stitch the lining all the way to the top of the bag but just up to the waist band so I hand stitched the lining. Also I added batting to the lining for the same reason I hand stitched it to the bag.

I measured the bag and cut 2 lining pieces in quilting cotton. I squilted both pieces separately.

Then I placed both pieces right sides facing together and stitched around 3 sides leaving the side that will go up open.

The lining also needs to have boxed corners. Do as you did for the bag.

The handles are heavy duty and store bought. I’m tired of my handles and straps deteriorating within a few months of using a bag. Place the handles about 6 inches apart. Pin. And stitch now.

Place the lining inside the bag, fold the top in and slip stitch around the waist.

Done!

This is it.

Big enough as a weekend bag or a beach bag.

Quilt-as-you-go (QAYG) Jane A. Stickle quilt

Free tutorial- Dear Jane Quilt as you go (QAYG)

This quilt is a first for me in two ways: it is my first foundation piecing quilt and it is my first QAYG quilt too.

Both techniques were a bit intimidating to me but both have turned out to be quite straight forward.

The diagram above is what I want the back of the quilt to look like. It looks a bit like a pixelated flower though my idea was to have like an explosion of colour starting with a very bright centre.

Fabric needs

  • 5 inch square in the backing fabric (you can use a charm square if your block fabrics are not washed)
  • 5 inch square of batting
  • one DJ block
  • 1 1/8 in x 5 1/2 in strip
  • 1 3/4 in x 5 1/2 in strip

Quilt-as-you-go method 1 – no hand sewing or batting required

Please ignore the use of a strip of batting for sashing on this video. Batting is only necessary for wide sashing. The fabric needs on the video are for a different quilt. Use the fabric needs above.

Quilt-as-you-go method 2 – hand sewing required

Step 1 – Quilt the blocks individually

Make a quilt sandwich by placing the backing fabric wrong side up, the batting on top and finally the block on top.

Pin or baste.

Quilt as desired. You don’t even have to quilt the block! Many batting types will take stitching 5 inches apart.

Block 1 is ready.

Do the same with block 2.

Step 2 – Cut and stitch the front and back sashing

Now cut your strips.

Fold the 1 3/4 in strip in half and press as per picture.

Place the 1 1/8 inch strip on the block as per picture.

Now turn over and place the 1 3/4 in strip on the back with the raw edge aligned to the quilt sandwich raw edge.

Pin.

Stitch all layers together with a 1/4 in allowance.

Now press open just the top strip (see picture).

Step 3 – Stitch next block

Attach the next block to the top strip by placing it aligned with the strip.

Turn over and pin. Notice we’re not doing anything with the folded strip.

Stitch block and strip together.

Both blocks are now stitched together via the top strip.

Time to stitch the back strip.

Step 4 – Hand stitch back sashing

Pin making sure the strip goes about 1/4 in over the next block and pin.

Slip stitch all along the edge.

Done.

Trim excess fabric from the strips’ sides.

The first two blocks are stitched together.

Eleven more to go!

Row A is finished….

Twelve more rows to go… and quite a few triangles.

If you want to see my DJ blocks, check out my Dear Jane progress page.