Jane A. Stickle Quilt block 6: JAS-A06 – Uncle Homer

This is a very easy block though I had to make it twice.

I cut the pieces the wrong size so when I finished the block and it was too small I worked out what the sizing should be.

But the sizing I worked out was wrong too! So when I finished the second block I had to trim it down to 5 in square. That’s why my corner squares a slightly smaller than need be and the centre square slightly larger.

I pieced this block.

Susan instructions call for:

  • 4 pieces 1 5/8in x 1 5/8in
  • 4 pieces 1 5/8in x 2 3/4in
  • 1 piece 2 3/4in x 2 3/4in

My block has:

  • 4 pieces 1 5/8in x 1 5/8in
  • 4 pieces 1 5/8in x 2 3/4in
  • 1 piece 3 1/8in square

With my sizing you’ll need to trim the block down to 5 inches, or about 1/8 in all around.

Where to get the Jane A. Stickle Quilt  patterns

Susan Gatewood’s paper foundation . All patterns are free though Susan says “I only ask that you consider making a donation to the Bennington Museum, in Bennington, Vermont.  And if you do, it would make me tremendously happy if you would tell them that you have received help from me.” I totally recommend Susan’s patterns as they are very easy to use.

Virtual quilt

See all blocks I’ve done together in a larger size.

Jane A. Stickle Quilt block 5: JAS-A05 – Cathie’s Campfire

This block was EASY.

My approach with this block was the same as for A02a and A03. I measured all triangles and squares (see pictures below), including the seam allowance, and cut them with an extra 1/4 in all around. Fabric waste was minimal.

I cut in brown:

  • 5 pieces 2 1/4 in square
  • 4 pieces 2 1/2 in square

In white:

  • 8 pieces 1 3/4 in square to cut in the diagonal to make 16 small triangles

 

Assemble as per diagram.

 

Done!

Where to get the Jane A. Stickle Quilt  patterns

Susan Gatewood’s paper foundation . All patterns are free though Susan says “I only ask that you consider making a donation to the Bennington Museum, in Bennington, Vermont.  And if you do, it would make me tremendously happy if you would tell them that you have received help from me.” I totally recommend Susan’s patterns as they are very easy to use.

Virtual quilt

See all blocks I’ve done together in a larger size.

Romantic floral lap quilt free pattern: easy pattern for beginners

This quilt is as easy as it gets. The blocks are easy four patch. To make it even easier use pre cut charm squares.

For tips on how to sew accurately this block if you’re a beginner quilter, check out Quilt basics article. There is a section called Matching Intersecting Seams half way down the article that shows how to make the perfect 4 patch block.

Quilt finished size: 41 3/4 in x 53 1/4 in.

Materials

  • 2 charm packs (usually each pack contains 42 x 5 in squares) or 80 x 5 inch fabric squares
  • 1 yard of cream fabric for sashing
  • 45 in x 55 in backing fabric
  • 45 in x 55 in quilt batting
  • half yard for binding. You will need a long strip 2 in x 192 in

Instructions

This quilt has 20 four patch blocks.

Arrange the charm squares to your liking ensuring there’s enough contrast in the chosen fabrics.

You will be making 20 blocks like this one:

Stitch left and right squares together in two rows. Then stitch both rows together.

Once you have all 20 four patch blocks stitched, it’s time to add the sashing.

Cut and add the sashing

This quilt can be done as Quilt as you go or QAYG:

or or you can do it the traditional way:

For the sashing you’ll need to cut

  • three 3 in x 53 1/4 in strips and
  • sixteen 3 in x 9 in strips.

Now let’s add the sashing.

Before you start, arrange the placement of the blocks on a flat surface.

Now take one block and  stitch a short strip to the bottom of the block.

Add the next block, and another short strip.

Do this 5 times until you have stitched 5 blocks in a column. Ensure that there is no sashing at the top and bottom of each column.

Do the steps above for make 3 more columns.

Now stitch the 4 columns using the long strips as per picture.

 

You’re almost done.

You just need to cut the batting and the backing fabric and quilt the three pieces together.

Machine binding

I have been machine binding my quilts lately. It takes a small fraction of the time compared to slip stitching them at the back.

To machine bind a quilt, you need to place the binding on the back of the quilt, aligned to the edge of the quilt, as opposed to stitching it to the front first.

For small lap quilts I don’t use binding cut on the bias but just cut straight from across the grain of the fabric.

To start, cut a strip about 225 in x 2 1/2 in. You’ll need to cut several strips and piece them together to obtain this length.

Fold the strip in half and iron well.

Take the quilt on the back and place the raw edge of the strip aligned with the quilt edge.

Mitered corners

Stitch all the way to the corner stopping at 1/4 in from the edge.

Now fold the strip up in a 45 degree angle as per picture.

Then fold the strip back aligning the fold with the top edge as per picture. Pin.

Now stitch all the way to the end again, stopping at 1/4 from the corner and do the same again for the next corner.

Once you have done the stitching your top will look like this.

Now fold the strip back over the top of the quilt. The binding will cover the raw edge all the way to covering the stitching line.

When you reach a corner, with your finger fold the mitred corner as per picture.  First fold in a 90 degree angle the binding at the corner.

And then fold back again as per picture making sure you align both corners.

Pin the whole quilt binding this way.

And now top stitch as close to the edge as possible.

The binding is done.

 

The quilt is finished!

Jane A. Stickle Quilt block 3: JAS-A03 or woman versus A03 block

I have made block A03 three times.

I was unhappy with the first attempt, the second one was no better, and today I decided to make it again.

After trying a very complicated method for attempt two I went back to good old needle turn applique. But this time using freezer paper.

Freezer paper is great. I had never used it until now.

I cut out the shapes and pressed it to the fabric and cut around leaving 1/4 in seam allowance.

Instead of using a compass to trace the circle, I first pressed the square, which I cut 1/2 in larger, in the diagonals.

Then with a ruler and a water soluble pen I marked 4 dots, barely visible in the picture, 1 1/4in from the centre on each four sides.

Then I marked the middle of the melon as per picture below.

I put a needle through both the melon mark and the dot in the background square.

Then make sure that the melon is perfectly in parallel with the top edge of the square.

Then and pin each corner on the diagonal line as per picture below.

Do this with all melons making sure that all melon corners touch.

It looks like a lot of pins but that was the best way I could come up with to ensure I was ready to baste.

I then basted on the outside circle.

I didn’t realise then but I do now looking at this picture where I went slightly wrong as the bottom melon outer edge doesn’t align to make a perfect circle.

To start, I folded the seam under the freezer paper on both corners and finger pressed as per picture.

I started stitching.

So far so good. I was quite happy about what I was seeing.

Looking good.

I spent quite a bit of time pulling the fabric under the freezer paper to remove tiny fabric folds in order to obtain smooth sides. This is done a lot easier if using freezer paper.

Not bad!

As you can see the outside seam looks a bit wider than the inner seam. I cut it intentionally wider because I intended to do reverse applique for the circle. But then I changed my mind and thought that I’d do the whole thing using needle turn applique.

So I trimmed the excess seam.

And did stitched around the circle. When I finished, I made an incision on the back of the melons and I removed the freezer paper.

I think this is it for A03.

See all blocks I’ve done together in a larger size.
Where to get the Jane A. Stickle Quilt patterns

Susan Gatewood’s paper foundation . All patterns are free though Susan says “I only ask that you consider making a donation to the Bennington Museum, in Bennington, Vermont. And if you do, it would make me tremendously happy if you would tell them that you have received help from me.” I totally recommend Susan’s patterns as they are very easy to use.

Jane A. Stickle Quilt block 3: JAS-A03 – Hunter’s Moon – Take 2

I had another go at A03 though it may not be the last.

While I think it’s an improvement on the first block, some things went wrong so the melons aren’t the same size and it looks a bit odd to me.

I’m not quite sure I even followed my own plan. I couldn’t get my head around all the layers and where to use freezer paper, etc.

This is the first time I use freezer paper by the way, and I love it. It made a world of difference to how smooth the sides of the melons turned out.

I planned to do reverse applique though in the end I did needle turn on one layer and reverse on the other.

So I cut 3 squares, a larger 5 1/2 in one for the top and 2 smaller 4 in squares for the other two layers.

Then I drew the circle on freezer paper. The diameter of the circle is 2 1/2 inches.

As you can see I was a bit confused about what I was doing because I drew two lines for the melons placement.

I eventually worked it out and cut out the centre.

Ironed it to the white fabric. And then I marked the line directly on the fabric where to cut the centre off.

Then the fun started. I cut the centre.

Pinned the smaller brown square underneath. It looks like I fussy cut the fabric but it was pure coincidence. I only realised later.

I appliqued the top fabric. As you can see things started to go wrong at this stage. The melons ends weren’t exactly touching.

Trim off fabric from the back.

Then I drew a circle in both the fabric and the freezer paper. This is again where I went wrong again.

The freezer paper circle wasn’t big enough or exactly round.

I pressed it to the wrong side of the fabric.

Cut around the circle and make small cuts around so that the fabric turned better.

Then place over the melons and finish the applique.

Trim off the white fabric as well and you’re done.

Not sure about how successful this second attempt is but I’m happier than take 1. What do you think?

Where to get the Jane A. Stickle Quilt patterns

Susan Gatewood’s paper foundation . All patterns are free though Susan says “I only ask that you consider making a donation to the Bennington Museum, in Bennington, Vermont. And if you do, it would make me tremendously happy if you would tell them that you have received help from me.” I totally recommend Susan’s patterns as they are very easy to use.