Mini bag tutorial


This is a tiny bag that can carry the essentials: a mobile or large mp3 player, up to 3 cards (credit card size), keys and money.

Cut

  • one 4in x 5 1/2 black square for the inside flap
  • two 11 in x 4 in rectangles for back and front of bag
  • one 11 in x 4 in rectangle for the largest pocket with flap
  • one 4 in x 4 in in plastic for a card pocket within the mobile pocket
  • one 4 in x 1 in as border for the plastic pocket
  • two 4 in x 8 in rectangles for pockets
  • one 10 3/4 in x 3 3/4 in fusible interface rectangle
  • 43 in x 1 1/2 in strip for strap

You will also need

    • 1 key holder
    • 2 fasteners
    • ribbon

The number of pockets and their location can be adapted to suit your needs.

The bag is designed to hold magnetic cards on the back and flap so that the cards can be swiped without taking them out of the bag. The mobile pocket has an insert in plastic instead of fabric to minimise the thickness of the divider.

Cut a 11 in x 4 in rectangle and a black 4 in x 5 1/2 in rectangle.

Sew together as per picture.

At two inches from each top and side edges, trace a line and stitch.

Trim corners.

Stitch around the sides of the black flap leaving a 1/4 seam allowance.

Turn inside out and iron flat.

Stitch around the edge and then 1/4 from the edge as per picture.

Cut one 10 3/4 in x 3 3/4 in fusible interface rectangle and iron to the panel that will be the exterior of the bag.

Cut a 11 in x 4 in rectangle. We will attach the pockets to this side panel.

Cut 4in x 8in rectangle and fold in half. Iron. Then place it on the top of the panel as per picture with the fold facing away from the raw edge of the bottom panel.

Cut a 4 in x 4 in in plastic for a card pocket within the mobile pocket and a strip of fabric 4in x 1 1/2 in. Attach the strip of fabric to the plastic top.

Now place the plastic insert on the opposite edge of the back panel (see picture) with the fabric border towards the centre of the panel.

Now place the rectangle with the flap you made earlier on top of the plastic insert.

Cut a 4 in x 8 in rectangle, fold in half and press.

Place on top of the piece with the flap as per picture.

Cut a piece of ribbon about 4 inches long and attach a key holder to it. Place the ribbon on one side of the bottom panel as per picture.

Strap

Cut a 44 inch x 1 1/2 inch piece of fabric and iron as per picture, first 1/4 inch from each side towards the middle and then in half again. Press well.

Stitch around both edges of the strap.

Fold the bottom panel in half and pin each side as per photo. This is where the strap goes.

Now pin everything in place well making sure the black flap and strap doesn’t get in the way when stitching around the edges.

Place the front panel with the interfacing on top of the bottom panel as per picture.

Stitch all around leaving a 2 inch opening on one of the narrow sides.

Now turn inside out. This is not an easy task!

Nearly there.

Iron well.

Stitch all around the bag closing the opening as you do this.

You can see the inside plastic pocket here.

Now you need to add 2 fasteners, one to the black flap and the other to the external flap.

The fastener is not visible from the external flap as I added it from within the pocket.

The inside flap has the fastener visible as it adds some interest to the bag.

The lenght of the strap can be adjusted.

Block 21: Lozenge smocking – Textured quilt sampler

Close up

The spacing determines the size of the tube. For a more subtle finish use spacing which is closer.

Block type: log cabin

Block size: 11 inches

Colour scheme: reds and neutrals

Texture/fabric manipulation: lozenge smocking

Quilt size: The finished quilt is 52 1/2 x 52 1/2.

Needs:

  • a 10 1/2 inch x 6 inches rectangle in cream tones for the centre square
  • two 5 in x 3 1/2 in rectangles and two 11 in x 3 1/2 in rectangles for the border

Making the lozenge smocking

Watch a short video tutorial:

Cut a 10 1/2 inch x 6 inches rectangle and mark at 1/2 inch intervals.

Smocking diagram

There are two kinds of stitching for this pattern. They alternate along each row of smocking. The first type is when you pull two stitches together as per a and b on the diagram. The next stitch is when you go from b to c but do not pull the stitches. In this case you double stitch on c so that there is no pulling.

This is the first example where you pick up a and b and pull together.

After pulling the stitches together, do a double stitch before moving on to c.

With your needle pick up c without pulling.

Double stitch at c.

And so on following the diagram above.

As you go you will see the pattern emerge.

When finished, stretch the rectangle on a padded surface and pin well. Slightly crush the tubes with your fingers to obtain a more rounded shape.

Apply steam with the iron touching the tubes but without pressing.

Let it dry. When dry trim to 5 inch squares.

Cut two 5 in x 3 1/2 in rectangles and two 11 in x 3 1/2 in rectangles for the border.

Stitch and the block is done.

Textured blocks tutorials

This is the 21th block in a series of 25 exploring texture in fabric.

Each block is made out of a centre 5 inch square featuring some fabric texture such as pin tucks, smocking, shirring and the like. Then a 3 1/2 wide border encloses each centre square.

The colour scheme is red and white/cream alternating reds and white/cream for the centre square and border.

Some of the textures show better on plain colours than on heavily patterned fabric.

See all Textured quilt sampler tutorials for this quilt.

Share your pictures

Are you making this quilt? Share your pictures on Flickr’s TeresaDownUnder group.

Easy peasy patchwork hot water bottle tutorial

Materials

  • 36 2 inch squares in red tones
  • 36 2 inch squares in blue tones
  • Coordinating scrap fabrics
  • Lining fabric
  • Batting
Assemble squares in red tones in a larger square as per photo below to make one panel.

Do the same with the blue squares.

Now cut

  • 2 strips  1 in x 9 in
  • 1 strip 1 in x 10 1/4 in for the bottom

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Cut the same pieces in the red tone contrasting fabric.

Place both panels right sides facing together and pin the bottom of the square as per photo and stitch along the pinned seam.

You will end up with one single piece as per photo below.

Cut a rectangle 10 1/4 in x 12 1/2 in in a blue tones fabric.

Pin to the blue side panel and stitch.

Do the same with the other panel.

Now fold in half and pin to the panel on the inside as per photo.

Stitch along the pinned line. Do the same with the other side.

Tie

Cut one long strip 29 in x 5 in. Fold in half right side together. Pin and make a cut on each ending as per picture.

Stitch along the edge leaving a 3 in opening to turn inside out. Turn inside out and top stitch along all sides of the tie.

Attach tie to the bag

Fold tie in half to find the middle of the tie and place a pin on it. Then find the middle of the top rectangle sidewise and longwise as per photo.

Pin tie in place making a small fold as per picture. Sew through the fold a couple of times.

Adding batting and lining

Cut a piece of batting 10 1/4 x 25 inches and a piece of lining 10 1/4 x 26 inches.

Place batting on top of the rectangle and add the lining on top. On the edges, cover the batting with the lining as per picture and pin in place.

Quilting

You are ready to quilt the triangle now.

I quilted both sides in a different way using diagonal lines on the blue side.

And straight lines on the red side.

Fold the rectangle in half right sides together and pin the sides as per picture.

Stitch both sides.

The bag is done.

To hide the seams that may be visible on the top part of the bag, choose a ribbon and place over the seam. Stitch ribbon to the fabric.

Detail of tie. The tie is tied around the neck of the bottle.

Block 20: Origami flower – Textured quilt sampler

Block type: log cabin

Block size: 11 inches

Colour scheme: reds and neutrals

Texture/fabric manipulation: fabric folding / fabric origami

Quilt size: The finished quilt is 52 1/2 x 52 1/2.

Needs:

  • a 10 1/2 inch square in red tones for the centre square.
  • two 5 in x 3 1/2 in rectangles and two 11 in x 3 1/2 in rectangles for the border
Making the origami flower
Learn in 3 minutes how to make this block:
When making origami using paper, the folds remain throughout the whole process because we only use our fingers to press. With fabric and an iron though it is easy to iron over the previous creases removing the crease. Therefore when pressing pay special attention to avoid ironing over previously made creases.
Cut a 10 1/2 inch square and fold it in half right sides of the fabric together. Press well.
Then fold it again to make a square and press again.
You now have two in folds making a cross on the fabric.

Turn piece around and fold in all 4 corners as per picture. Press well but do not press over the previous creases.

This is what your piece will look like.

Turn it around. You still can see the creases from the first folds you made.

Now you need to make two folds that will meet in the center.

This is the first fold. Press keeping the previous creases.

Now fold the other side to meet in the middle. Press again keeping the previous creases.

Now unfold the last two folds. We’re nearly there folding and pressing.

Now fold both sides of the square to meet in the middle, just like you did before, but this time do it with the other two sides of the square.

We have finished folding and pressing. You can see now that with all that folding we have 2 lines crossing on the diagonal plus two more lines making a small square.

Now fold along the pressed lines as per picture making a sort of ear.

Fold the “ear” to the side.

Do this in every corner always folding to the same side.

You will get a windmill like in the photo below.

Now pick up one of the corners and lift it up like in the photo below.

Then push it open to the middle as per photo.

Do the same with all corners.

Time to open each petal.

Pick up every corner and push it towards the back as per picture.

Do this with all 4 corners.

Turn the flower.

Open the folded triangles like in the picture.

The flower is nearly done.

To hold the petals together, make a few stitches in the middle.

Cover a button with fabric or use a regular button.

Sew the button in the middle.

Press the folds in the corners of the square.

Now cut two 5 in x 3 1/2 in rectangles and two 11 in x 3 1/2 in rectangles for the border.

To attach the border, lift the petal and fold it forward.

Pin the border.

Stitch using a 1/4 inch allowance.

Iron seams to one side.

Do the same for the other two sides of the border.

Iron seams and you’re done.

 

Textured blocks tutorials

This is the 20th block in a series of 25 exploring texture in fabric.

Each block is made out of a centre 5 inch square featuring some fabric texture such as pin tucks, smocking, shirring and the like. Then a 3 1/2 wide border encloses each centre square.

The colour scheme is red and white/cream alternating reds and white/cream for the centre square and border.

Some of the textures show better on plain colours than on heavily patterned fabric.

See all Textured quilt sampler tutorials for this quilt.

Share your pictures

Are you making this quilt? Share your pictures on Flickr’s TeresaDownUnder group.

Embroidered fabric tea cozy tutorial

Embroidered fabric tea cozy tutorial

  • Half a yard of your favourite fabric
  • Matching lining fabric
  • Scraps for the top petals
  • Embroidery floss in matching colours
  • Batting
Pattern
  • Teapot cozy pattern (pdf). The pattern is for a pot 11 ½ x 21 ½ (see below on how to measure your teapot)
Embroidery
Choose a fabric where the embroidery will show well. I chose the fabric below mostly because the white leaves were perfect to add the embroidery to.
I worked with 3 embroidery floss strands and used a variety of embroidery stitches to fill in the white leaves.

Detail of the embroidery.

Measuring your teapot

Measure your teapot around the widest part and add one extra inch:  21 and a half.

Now measure it around its height from side to side and add an extra inch: 11 and a half.

Divide both measurements by 2 and add 1 inch to each.

My teapot is 22 ½ around by 12 ½  high. Using these figures I made the teapot pattern (pdf). If this pattern doesn’t fit your teapot, which is quite likely, you can use the method I just explained to create your own pattern.

Cut panels

Using the pattern cut 2 pieces of the outside fabric and 2 of the lining fabric.

To cut, fold the fabric in half and place the pattern on the fold as per picture below. Cut around the pattern.

Add batting

Cut two rectangles of batting larger than the front panels and pin to the fabric.

Quilt and trim.

Making the top petals

Cut 3 4 inch squares.

Fold twice into a smaller square.

Now round the corners.

With a strong thread gather the fabric as per picture.

Do the same with each square and stitch them together as you go.

Sewing the panels together

Place one panel right side up, then place the petals in the middle facing the bottom of the panel.

Place the second panel with the wrong side up and pin in place.

Cutting the lining

Using the pattern cut 2 more panels for the lining. Pin in place.

Stitch around leaving a 3 inch opening at the top to turn the cozy inside out.

Pink the corners after stitching.

Adding the lining

Place the quilted side of the cozy inside the lining as per picture below. Align the edges well and pin in place.

Stitch all along the edge.

Turn inside out through the 3 inch hole in the lining.

Stitch the opening in the lining.

The lining will be slightly larger than the quilted cozy so it will overflow at the base. Use this bit of extra lining to add a small border as per picture. Just iron the extra lining and topstitch.

Top detail.

The teapot is finished.