Make a quilt: 17 free tutorials of my quilts

In this post I’m putting together a number of the quilts I have learned with and the techniques I’ve experimented with. You will find traditional quilts along side improv patchwork and textured quilts.

Improv quilts

Improv/free form quilt series

Each of these six blocks are in themselves a mini quilt and could be turned into a larger quilt as well.

Semi-improv 9-patch quilt tutorial

A traditional block taken a step further by splicing it and rearranging it into making a different block.

Improv patchwork back of quilt

This is a good way to get into improv quilting. Just make a strip of random pieces of fabric stitched together.

Improv patchwork Christmas back of quilt

Doing an improv back of a quilt is a way to loosen up after you complete a highly structured quilt like the zig zag quilt on the other side of this back of quilt.

Free form, free motion patchwork trial

This mini quilt was my first attempt at free form or improv patchwork. It is done in a kind of log cabin way from the inside out.

 

Free form patchwork mini quilt – visual creative process

I liked my first free form mini quilt so much I made a second one. This time the quilt is assembled out of different pieces.

 

Textured quilts

Textured 4-patch quilt tutorial (16 textures)

Some traditional and some new textures in this quilt.

Textured quilt sampler (25 textures)

Most textures in this quilt are traditiona such as pin tucks, shirring, pleats but also there are more uncommon fabric manipulations such as fabric origami.

 Charm pack quilts

“Doubly charming” charm pack quilt tutorial

Made with charm packs this is a very quick but beautiful quilt .

“Doubly charming” charm pack back of quilt tutorial

Made with the left over charms, this back of quilt could very well be a quilt top on its own.

Disappearing nine patch quilt

This is a very easy quilt made with charm squares. The fabric is also beautiful.

Disappearing nine patch variation quilt top

Disappearing nine patch was fun to do so I made a second one using a variation of the block using the same charm packs. I think the prairie points make this quilt look girly and cute.

Père-Noël zigzag quilt tutorial

This zigzag quilt comes with a twist: it uses rectangles to make the zigzag lines. Very easy to do and finished with some embroidery touches.


Scrappy quilts

Wonky log cabin tutorial

Use bright fabrics to make this quilt more fun and add to the wonkiness.

 


Sampler quilt

A traditional quilt made with fat quarters though it could well be made with fabric scraps. I made this quilt because I wanted to improve my patchwork skills. I think it worked.


Coin quilt

You don’t know what to do with all those fabric scraps in your scrap bin? Make a coin quilt. Try different colour combinations, even alternating white and colour rectangles, different thickness, etc for a different look.

Paper pieced scrappy flower hexagon quilt

This quilt is in progress and a long term project where I can use all the small scraps from other projects.

I have made a couple more quilts, including my biggest project: Farmer’s wife quilt sampler but this sample should be enough to choose from.

 

cook … eat … repeat tea towel

A couple of years ago I planned to make two tea towels. Somehow I only got around making one: the French cuisine tea towel.

This is the second one. It’s not a set and it is a faster project with a lot less embroidery. I’m also making use of my textured tutorials I posted as I’m using prairie points for the border.

Both tea towels make great gifts.

If you make one, I’d like to see it. Please upload it to my TeresaDownUnder Flickr pool.

Materials

  • Variegated stranded cotton
  • White fabric – I cut a piece 20 in x 5 1/2 in
  • Tea towel
  • 4 x 5 in charm squares – 3 for the trim and 1 for the embroidery sides

Kitchen towel size

32 x 22 1/2 inches. For a different towel size increase or decrease the pattern below when printing.

Embroidery

Embroidery stitch: stem stitch (stem stitch video tutorial – link will open in another window)

Download pattern

  • Teatowel lettering (pdf – 2 pages). When printing scale it down or up to match your tea towel width

Method

Print the pattern and stick matching the lines as per picture.

Place the strip of white fabric over.

 

Make sure the letters are centred and straight.

Trace with water soluble pen.

 

My variegated embroidery cotton matches the charms colours.

 

Embroider using stem stitch.

 

Press well.

When finished trim the embroidery down to 5 in wide. Then cut 3/4 in from each edge.

At this stage I wanted to add some colour to each edge so I used a charm square for this purpose.

Get a 5 in charm square and cut it in half and stitch each half to each side.

 

Press seams open.

 

Prairie points

For my tea towel I used 3 charm squares, i.e. 12 prairie points. If your tea towel is smaller or larger you may need fewer or more.

I will explain quickly how to make a prairie point here but if you need more visuals try my prairie point tutorial.

Cut each charm square into 4 2 1/2 in squares.

 

Fold in half. Then fold in half again and press the corner with your finger.

Then drag each side corner meet in the middle as per picture.

 

Stitch along each prairie point at 1/8 in from the edge.

 

 

 

Now make a 1/4 seam on each side of the embroidery strip.

 

On both sides.

 

Pin the strip aligned to the edge. Fold the edges in on both edges as per picture. Pin well.

 

Now place the prairie points between the tea towel and the embroidery strip. Pin well making sure everything is aligned.

 

Your will need to adjust the distance between prairie points depending on the width of your tea towel. A bit of overlapping is fine.

Stitch making sure that all three layers – embroidery strip, prairie points and tea towel – are aligned. Use many pins if necessary to avoid having to unpick the stitches as I had to do.

 

To finish stitch also the top of the embroidery strip .

 

Done!

 

Père-Noël zigzag quilt tutorial part two: embellishing the quilt top with embroidery

This is the second part in a series of three tutorials. Part one shows you how to make a Christmas themed quilt top using charm squares.

See also:

In this tutorial I will embroider a French Christmas children song on the quilt top and do some other embroidery on the white fabric as an extension to the fabric print.

This is the song:

Père-Noël

Un, deux, trois

Qui est-là ?

Père-Noël

Père-Noël

Entre vite, il fait très froid,

Bonne fête et chocolat !

Father Christmas

One, two, three

Who’s there?

Father Christmas

Father Crhistmas

Come in fast, it is very cold,

Happy Christmas and chocolate!

Download:

French Christmas song embroidery for tracing (pdf).

WARNING: The song sentences do not fit the zig zag lines exactly. You will need to move the paper to make it fit better to the zig zag path.

Print pattern and stick together.

Placing the paper underneath the top, trace the song making sure the words follow the white fabric zig zag area.

Closeups of the song

Using stranded cotton in matching colours embroider the song using stem stitch.

The song has been embroidered.

Pattern matching embroidery

To complement the poem, I decided to extend the patterned fabric into the white areas so I selected some prints and drew the rest of the flowers or graphic elements using a water soluble marker.

Just a few graphic elements here and there.

Spread out throughout the whole quilt.

And then I embroidered those.

I like the look of the pattern overflowing the white areas.

The top is ready for the backing and quilting.